Tag Archives: Editor’s Picks

Imagine That Photography Tribe

Editor’s Picks from Weeks 11 and 12

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Bokeh Baby! Copyright Mihaela Limberea 2012.

In our Week 11 Module, the Tribe produced some gorgeous bokeh with shallow depth of field and being mindful of the placement of light.

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Bokeh Baby! Copyright Cynthia Swidler 2012.

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Bokeh Baby! Copyright Cyndi Louden 2012.

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Bokeh Baby! Copyright Einstein Lavina 2012.

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Bokeh Baby! Copyright Schalk Ras 2012.

The following module for Week 12, we learned how to add a texture layer to our photos in Photoshop, to add a bit of drama to the images.

Imagine That Photography Tribe

Copyright Cynthia Swidler 2012.

Imagine That Photography Tribe

Copyright Mihaela Limberea 2012.

 See more posts from the Tribe when you join us! Join the Imagine That Photography Tribe on Facebook to participate in weekly modules, discuss photography, and learn tips and techniques, one week at a time.

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Welcome back and thanks for reading Imagine That!

If you like what’s on the blog, let us know by commenting! To keep updated with new posts, subscribe to Imagine That! by clicking on the RSS Feed button on the upper right of the Homepage. It would also be cool to be friends with you on Facebook, or connect with you on Twitter.

You might also like:
Stripped to its Essence: The Beauty of Black and White
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Stripped to its Essence: the Beauty of Black and White

Editor’s Picks, Week 10 Module “Monochrome Madness”

Monochromatic photography is making imagery that has only one hue. Between black and white, the grayscale in between make up the range of frequencies in a monochromatic image. It can be warmer, with a yellow tinge, or cooler, with a bluish hue.

Imagine That Photography Tribe

Copyright Ker GL 2012.

Imagine That Photography Tribe

Copyright Einstein Lavina 2012.

Maybe the sentimentality of the classic film days and photography greats shooting in black and white makes black and white seem more gritty. Maybe this led to monochrome being a preference of photojournalism in the days before newspapers could print in full color. Or maybe it was the other way around, the newspaper photographs being the inspiration for shooters to use monochrome.

Imagine That Photography Tribe

Copyright Prima Ongsvises 2012.

But actually, monochrome is the most unrealistic of imagery. Without the color of real life, the monochrome photograph is extremely interpretive, stripping an image to its essentials.

Form

The way in which we seek to see the world, looking for edges to find shape. Like a lens seeking contrast to focus, we are captivated by the forms without the distraction of color. We are able to find harmony in the ways the pieces of the composition fit.

Imagine That Photography Tribe

Copyright Cynthia Swidler 2012.

 

Imagine That Photography Tribe

Copyright Sarah Darr 2012.

Light

If we could see in monochrome only like a motion picture camera, we would strip the image to its muse. The values of light and dark would jump out at our vision, and we choose how to arrange it artfully. Monochrome allows us to focus on only the difference between highlights and shadows. We can make a picture with just a shadow, and a patch of light.

Imagine That Photography Tribe

Copyright Cyndi Louden 2012.

Imagine That Photography Tribe

Copyright Mihaela Limberea 2012.

Contrast

Monochrome allows us to add drama without color. With only the intensity of the difference between the whites and the blacks in the image, we can add a little vision and make a single image a narrative.

Imagine That Photography Tribe

Copyright Schalk Ras 2012.

 

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Welcome back and thanks for reading Imagine That!

If you like what’s on the blog, let us know by commenting! To keep updated with new posts, subscribe to Imagine That! by clicking on the orange RSS Feed button on the upper right of the Homepage. It would also be cool to be friends with you on Facebook, or connect with you on Twitter.

You might also like:
6 Ways to Start Your Photography Hobby
Easy Way to Dodge and Burn Photos without Destroying Pixels
5 Myths about Creativity a Photographer Should Bust
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10 Small Things that make a Big Difference in Your Photos

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Tips and Tricks from Module 5 Editor’s Picks: “Time”

The camera can be told to take a picture of time.

That’s what the Imagine That Photography Tribe proved this week with their images. The assignment was to use shutter speed to create photos of motion, implying the passing of time. We used the techniques of panning and slow shutter exposures to make our images.

Here are the highlights of what we learned.

1. Panning can be done in bright light, with some adjustments.

 

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Copyright Einstein Lavina 2012.

These two photos, above and below, show some shadows, and the shadows indicate where the light is coming from.

Imagine That Photography Tribe

Copyright David Ng Soon Thong

The first photo shows a shadow directly below the subject, so this photo was taken during the middle of the day, when the light is brightest.  In the second photo, the shadows are in the foreground, telling us that the light is directly in front of the camera, behind the panned subjects.

Panning during the middle of the day might result in a photo with blown out highlights. The slow shutter allows so much light in, since the shutter is left open longer, that the highlights are able to reflect too much light into the lens.

How could we use the panning in the middle of the day? To reduce the light coming into the lens, we can do these things:

  • Use a Neutral Density filter to block out some of the light, resulting in a better exposure.
  • Use a polarizing filter, which has the same effect, except the filter is blue instead of gray.
  • Convert the photo to a black and white, to hide the blown out highlights.

2. Water is hard to expose with a slow shutter, except when you can control light.

Imagine That Photography Tribe

Copyright Ker Geok Lan 2012.

These two slow shutter shots were taken when the light was still bright. We can see that the cameras had a bit of trouble holding on to detail in the whites or highlights. This is also because the shutter is left open for longer, allowing more light in, resulting in the whites in the scene reflecting too much light.

Imagine That Photography Tribe

Copyright Einstein Lavina 2012.

The solutions would be to use Neutral Density filters, a small aperture (f/22 if possible), and a tripod.

3. Panning can be done in a non- linear motion.

Cynthia made a comment about her photo of the skater, How could she have panned this shot when the motion was not linear?

Imagine That Photography Tribe

Copyright Cynthia Swidler 2012.

Vincent gave us the answer to Cynthia’s question. Changing the point of view and using a slow shutter for the same motion as the subject can result in a non-linear technique.

Imagine That Photography Tribe

Copyright Vincent Ng 2012.

4. Different shutter speeds are necessary for panning different moving objects.

In the Module, it was suggested that all things being equal, walking people usually render sharp in the image at around 1/15s, and motorbikes or slow moving cars around 1/30s. Schalk’s photo of a fast moving car is a little blurred because probably the shutter speed was a little slow for the subject. This teaches us to experiment with different shutter speeds for different subjects, to make the subject sharp in the photo using panning technique.

Imagine That Photography Tribe

Copyright Schalk Ras 2012.

 

Sarah’s photo of the swinging boy shows us that she focused on his face as she panned back and forth. The boy’s face is the sharpest part of the photo.

Imagine That Photography Tribe

Copyright Sarah Darr 2012.

5. Panning and slow shutter make colors pop in low light.

Imagine That Photography Tribe

Copyright Vincent Ng 2012.

Vincent’s photo of a parade at night is bursting with color. The slow shutter allowed the night lights to blend in the blur as he panned the people.

6. Change the lens, change the image.

Finally, we learn that a particular focal length can change the image. This photo of star trails (during a very cold night!) was shot with a zoom at the long end. The long lens caused an effect that seems to ‘flatten’ the elements in the frame.  Had Sarah chosen a wider frame by using a different lens, she might have got a different effect in the photo.

 

Imagine That Photography Tribe

Copyright Sarah Darr 2012.

What I learned from the Tribe from Module 5 is to constantly experiment with techniques and equipment, to get different results. Then, learn from the results. Yay to the Tribe! I hope you will continue to practice your slow shutter technique and panning, and have fun with your interpretations of motion and time.

How would you like to learn photography one module at a time? Head over to our Facebook page and Like us so you can be updated every time a module is posted. Share your photos and get some feedback. And get a chance to have your photos featured in Editor’s Picks posts and a monthly wrap up of lessons!

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Welcome back and thanks for reading Imagine That! To keep updated with new posts, subscribe to Imagine That! by clicking on the RSS Feed button on the upper right of the Homepage.

You might also like:
11 Ways to Build a Better Photo
10 Online Resources for Photography Enthusiasts

The Beginner’s Guide to Photography’s Holy Trinity

 

Copyright Cynthia Swidler 2012.

Editor’s Picks: Week 4 Module “Looking for Light”

“Photography is a great excuse for seeing things you ordinary wouldn’t.”

Christopher Beirne, who authored this quote, probably meant that when you focus your camera on light, you begin to change the way you see.

Light can make the ordinary extraordinary, as the Imagine That Photography Tribe found out last week while shooting for Week 4 Module, Looking for Light.

Here are the images from a fantastic week with the Tribe. And here’s the time when I just shut up and let these eloquent images do the talking.

Copyright Cynthia Swidler 2012.

Copyright Vincent Ng 2012.

Copyright Einstein Lavina 2012.

Copyright Prima Ongsvises 2012.

Copyright Ker Geok Lan 2012.

Copyright Schalk Ras 2012.

Copyright Ntutu Letseka 2012. Took this one with a Nokia! Amazing.

Copyright Sarah Darr 2012.

 

You can also check out Tribe member Mihaela Limberea’s awesome images here.

That wraps up a beautiful and enlightening week here for us at Imagine That Photography Tribe.

If you want to journey with us as we rekindle love for all kinds of photography in 2012, and learn lots of things along the way, head on over to our new Facebook page (and like us!), where you can participate in project modules, get some feedback, talk photography, and have your photography featured in a monthly roundup!

_________________
Welcome back and thanks for reading Imagine That!

If you like what’s on the blog, let us know by commenting! To keep updated with new posts, subscribe to Imagine That! by clicking on the RSS Feed button on the upper right of the Homepage. It would also be cool to be friends with you on Facebook, or connect with you on Twitter.

You might also like:
Week 4 Module Looking for Light
10 Things that will Transform Your Photographic Composition
Editor’s Picks Week 2 “Backlit Beauty”
Week 2 Module Backlit Beauty
10 Small Things that Make a Big Difference in Your Photos

Copyright Ntutu Letseka 2012.

Editor’s Picks: Week 2 Module “Backlit Beauty”

With one small step, you can make great leaps in your photography.

This week’s project results for the theme “Backlit Beauty” teaches us that. We learned about one direction of a light source and how it can be used to create stunning shots.

Ntutu Letseka

Copyright Ntutu Letseka 2012.

Ntutu used film to capture light rays, also called “God rays” or “crepuscular rays” –beams of light that often show up when atmospheric conditions are just right, making the light visible. Schalk Ras, another Tribe member, commented in our Facebook Tribe page, “…digital won’t do that in one exposure.” Ntutu shot this with an Olympus OMPC, Zuiko 40mm lens on Agfa Vista 200 film.

Ker GL

Copyright Ker Geok Lan 2012.

Ker GL who attended a workshop with me last September, remembered her lesson on using the exposure compensation for a backlit shot very well, for the Backlit Beauty module. Ker used a lot of underexposure to narrow the visible part of this image, highlighting the shapes of the leaves and the contrast of the almost complete silhouette with the bright spot of late afternoon light.

Sarah Darr

Copyright Sarah Darr 2012.

Sarah Darr focused on catching a rim light around Nikko, King of the Backyard. We can tell that Sarah was working on a couple things at the same time in her image—the general way that Nikko was behaving, and her angle relative to the cat. She teaches us to move around to find that perfect angle to catch rim light.

Schalk Ras

Copyright Schalk Ras 2012.

Schalk Ras shot this graphic composition on a gray day. Often, overcast days may present a challenge in capturing a high-contrast shot such as a backlit image. We can see that Schalk focused on shapes to make his image work.

Mercy Angela Nantongo

Copyright Mercy Angela Nantongo 2012.

Mercy Angela Nantongo captioned her photo “for lack of a better subject” this week. Although the subject is an everyday object, Angela chose an unusual angle to shoot. She abstracts the shape of the lamp and gives us a photo that skillfully uses negative space to balance the composition.

Mihaela Limberea

Copyright Mihaela Limberea 2012.

Mihaela Limberea found this gorgeous shot of a backlit branch on her walk.  She uses exposure compensation to bring attention to the light illuminating the branch, using the shadows to push attention to the light.

With one small step, you too can make great leaps in your photography. Join us, the Imagine That Photography Tribe, as we take on one challenge a week in our Project 52 in 2012!

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Welcome back and thanks for reading Imagine That!

If you like what’s on the blog, let us know by commenting! To keep updated with new posts, subscribe to Imagine That! by clicking on the RSS Feed button on the upper right of the Homepage. It would also be cool to be friends with you on Facebook, or connect with you on Twitter.

Check out what the Tribe has done so far:

52 Ways to Better Photography in 2012
Week 1 Module Tiny Landscapes
Week 2 Module Backlit Beauty
How to Fool Your Point and Shoot into Thinking it’s a DSLR
Week 3 Module What’s in the Frame
Composition and the Use of Color